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Reviews of Dr. Sanjay Dhawan - Best Opthalmologist in India

Dr. Sanjay Dhawan

Opthalmologist
New Delhi, India
25 Years of experience
Reviews of Dr. Vandana Khullar - Best Opthalmologist in India

Dr. Vandana Khullar

Opthalmologist
New Delhi, India
24 Years of experience
Reviews of Dr. Deepali Garg Mathur - Best Opthalmologist in India

Dr. Deepali Garg Mathur

Opthalmologist
New Delhi, India
12 Years of experience
Reviews of Dr. Kartikeya Sangal - Best Opthalmologist in India

Dr. Kartikeya Sangal

Opthalmologist
New Delhi, India
18 Years of experience
Reviews of Dr. Surya Kant Jha - Best Opthalmologist in India

Dr. Surya Kant Jha

Opthalmologist
New Delhi, India
14 Years of experience
Reviews of Dr. Sonika Gupta - Best Opthalmologist in India

Dr. Sonika Gupta

Opthalmologist
New Delhi, India
22 Years of experience
Reviews of Dr. Rajiv Mohan - Best Opthalmologist in India

Dr. Rajiv Mohan

Opthalmologist
New Delhi, India
25 Years of experience
Reviews of Dr. Parul Sharma - Best Opthalmologist in India

Dr. Parul Sharma

Opthalmologist
New Delhi, India
22 Years of experience
Reviews of Dr. Prashaant Chaudhry - Best Opthalmologist in India

Dr. Prashaant Chaudhry

Opthalmologist
New Delhi, India
15 Years of experience
Reviews of Dr. Vivek Garg - Best Opthalmologist in India

Dr. Vivek Garg

Opthalmologist
New Delhi, India
15 Years of experience

Frequently Asked Questions

Who is an Ophthalmologist?

Medical specialists who are trained in the diagnosis and treatment of eye and vision issues are known as ophthalmologists. Eye exams, vision testing, and prescriptions for glasses or contact lenses are all provided by ophthalmologists. They can diagnose and treat any and all eye disorders. They are capable of doing eye surgery as well as providing follow-up care.

An ophthalmologist will examine how your pupils react to light, check your eye problems, and ensure that the muscles that move your eyes are in good functioning order. They will examine the back of your eye including the retina and optic nerve for any early indicators of eye issues such as cataracts or glaucoma.

What conditions do ophthalmologists treat?

Ophthalmologists are trained and certified to treat, diagnose, and prevent a variety of eye conditions including:

  • corneal conditions
  • cataracts
  • glaucoma
  • retinal conditions including macular degeneration and diabetic retinopathy
  • Problems associated with children or childhood eye conditions
  • Cases of eye issues due to neurological causes or components including optic nerve problems, double vision, abnormal eye movements, and some specific types of vision loss
  • Eye loss due to complex surgical procedures, such as reconstructive surgery or advanced vision repair

In addition to providing care and treatment for the eyes and vision problems, an ophthalmologist's medical knowledge may enable them to detect signs of illnesses that are not directly related to the eye. In such circumstances, they can direct clients to the appropriate physician or work in collaboration with other specialists.

What are the qualifications of an ophthalmologist?

  • Before beginning an ophthalmology residency program, all individuals must complete a full medical program i.e. a degree in MBBS.
  • An ophthalmologist may take a residency program that might be of anywhere from 4 to 7 years depending on the university or institute curriculum.
  • Diagnosis and management of internal and exterior eye problems are usually covered in the residency program in detail.

Subspecialty training and certification for eye diseases

  • An ophthalmologist can decide to further receive surgical training for a wide range of eye problems.
  • In addition to hands-on patient care, ophthalmology residency training includes conducting surgical operations under supervision which is followed by an extensive one-year internship.

What are the subspecialties of ophthalmologists?

Ophthalmologists may receive specific training to earn a subspeciality in any of the following:

  • glaucoma
  • pediatrics
  • the cornea
  • plastic and reconstructive surgery
  • ocular oncology
  • the retina
  • uveitis
  • refractive surgery
  • neuro-ophthalmology

An ophthalmologist subspecialist has typical training that focuses on eye disorders that are complex in origin, involve a specific region of the eye, or affect certain populations of patients. They also receive more intensive training than typical ophthalmologists in order to execute exceedingly complex surgery on the delicate eye's parts.

What diagnostic tests are required by an Ophthalmologist?

An ophthalmologist can order a variety of diagnostic tests to pinpoint the exact problem and work to the right treatment to cure it.

Some common diagnostic tests related to eyes involve:

Corneal Topography

  • Electro-Diagnostic Testing
  • Color Vision Test

Computerized Optic Disc Imaging

Nerve Fiber Layer Analysis

Specular Microscopy

Visual Field Tests

Fluorescein Angiography

Ocular Coherence Tomography (OCT)

Photography of the Eye

Ultrasound of the Eye

When should you visit an Ophthalmologist?

A general physician can recommend you to an ophthalmologist in cases of eye-related issues. However, some specific signs and symptoms that need the attention of ophthalmologists are:

  • bulging eyes
  • Vision with colored circles or halos while looking at lights
  • misaligned eyes
  • reduced, distorted, blocked, or double vision
  • excessive tearing
  • eyelid abnormalities or problems
  • unexplained eye redness
  • loss of peripheral vision
  • Strings or black straps in the vision while looking at a wide field area
  • seeing flashes of light

In cases of the below-mentioned signs and symptoms an emergency contact and visit to an ophthalmologist is required:

  • sudden or severe eye pain
  • eye injury
  • sudden vision loss or changes

Some diseases are known to increase the risk factors of developing an eye problem or vision impairment in later stages of life. A general physician will recommend you to an Ophthalmologist in case of such a finding. Some of these conditions involve:

  • HIV
  • thyroid conditions, for example, Graves’ disease
  • high blood pressure
  • diabetes
  • a family history of eye conditions

What can you expect from your first visit with an Ophthalmologist?

The initial appointment to the ophthalmologist will consist of a one-and-a-half-hour complete evaluation of the patient's problem, records, and medical history. If you require specialized testing or have complex eye problems, your appointment may take longer.

While visiting an ophthalmologist for the first time, an individual should keep in mind to bring all their previous reports and other paperwork.

Tests of vision: On the first visit the doctor will examine your near and far eyesight. You'll be asked to read from a chart with random letters on it. Other components of your vision may be tested as well, such as your ability to perceive in 3-D, side vision, also known as peripheral vision, and color perception.

Tonometry: This is a glaucoma test. The doctor will measure your eye pressure with a puff of air with a device called a tonometer after numbing your eye with an eye drop.

Examine your eyes: The doctor will examine all of your eye's components. Drops may be required to dilate your pupils. This allows the doctor to see the interior of your eye clearly. For a few hours, these drops make your eyes sensitive to light. You'll have to keep your sunglasses on till they fall off. It's possible that you'll need someone to drive you home. The doctor will also examine your peripheral vision and the coordination of your eye muscles.

After a thorough examination process, the doctor will give you a diagnosis and appropriate treatment plan for the same.